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                                                                       BIOGRAPHIES

WE WILL GIVE BIOGRAPHIES ON PEOPLE WHO ARE THINKERS, FIGHTERS,

                     OR STRAIGHT UP CONTROVERSAL FROM ANY RACE OR NATIONALITY.

 

 

 

    BIOGRAPHIES LINKS

  Nikola Tesla: a short biography   Nikola Tesla   Zecharia Sitchin

                                                        

                                             THE HONORABLE MINISTER LOUIS FARRAKHAN
                       National Representative of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad

 

Minister Louis Farrakhan was born "Louis Eugene Walcott" on May 11,1933, in Roxbury, Massachusetts, and was reared in a highly disciplined and spiritual household. Reared by his mother, Mae, a native of St. Kitts, he and his brother Alvan learned early the value of work, responsibility and intellectual development. Having a strong sensitivity to the plight of Black people, his mother engaged her sons in conversations about the struggle for freedom, justice and equality. She also exposed them to progressive material such as the Crisis Magazine, published by the NAACP.

Recognizing her son's artistic talent, she gave young Louis a violin before his sixth birthday. This began years of formal training financed by his mother's hard work as both seamstress and housekeeper. By age 13, he had played with the Boston College Orchestra and the Boston Civic Symphony. The talent of young Louis was given national exposure at age 14 when he won the Ted Mack Amateur Hour. He was also one of the first Blacks to appear on the popular show.

Graduating from high school at age 16, he earned an athletic scholarship for his prowess as a track sprinter and attended Winston-Salem Teachers' College in North Carolina, excelling in the study of English.

During his senior year in September 1953, he married his childhood sweetheart, Betsy [Sister Khadijah Farrakhan]. He left college that same year to begin a family, and supported his family by using his talent as a performing artist.

Popularly known as "The Charmer," he achieved fame in Boston as a vocalist, calypso singer, dancer, and violinist. However, February 1955 marked a turning point in the life of Louis Walcott. While headlining a show in Chicago titled "Calypso Follies" the young virtuoso received rave reviews. During this engagement one of his friends from Boston invited him to attend the Nation of Islam's Saviors' Day Convention, to be held at the newly purchased Muhammad Temple No. 2 at 5335 S. Greenwood Avenue.

He had briefly met Minister Malcolm X in Boston in1953. Now, in 1955, Minister Malcolm was informed that the popular musician would attend the convention. An arrangement was made between the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, Minister Malcolm and his Captain, Yusef Shah, that the latter was to sit next to young Louis in such a way that the Honorable Elijah Muhammad might recognize him. At one point, while listening to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad from his balcony seat, Louis thought to himself, "This man can't speak," referring to Mr. Muhammad's grammar. As these thoughts crossed the future leader's mind, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad looked up in the balcony and said, "Don't pay no attention to how I say it. Pay attention to what I say, then take it and put it into that fine language that you know." He was shocked and shrunk back in his seat.

Although music had been his first love, within three months after joining the Nation of Islam in 1955, Minister Malcolm X told the New York Mosque, including the new convert Louis X, that the Honorable Elijah Muhammad had said that all Muslims would have to get out of show business or get out of the Temple. Brother Louis X, later renamed Louis Farrakhan, by his teacher, chose to dedicate his life to the Teachings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad.

After moving to Boston at the request of Malcolm X, Louis X proved himself a capable, disciplined, and a well-mannered soldier and eventually rose to the rank of Minister. He worked faithfully from 1956 as the Minister of Muhammad Temple No. 11 in Boston, Massachusetts, building it to become one of the strongest Temples in the Nation.

One significant factor in his development was his strict adherence to a principle of the right development of good leadership. Young Louis thought he was going to Boston to become the Minister there. The Honorable Elijah Muhammad, however, knew well how to develop the talent of his young follower. He told Minister Malcolm to put him under the person whom he was really to replace.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad said to Malcolm that if you can't serve under you can't serve  over. Minister Farrakhan was a faithful helper of the staff and of the Believers, before and after he became the Minister of that Temple, in Boston, where he lived until 1965.

In May of 1965, three months after the death of Malcolm X, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad appointed Minister Farrakhan over Temple No. 7 in New York City. When he arrived in New York the atmosphere was very hostile
because of allegations of Muslim involvement in the assassination of Malcolm X.

Minister Farrakhan worked night and day in the Harlem community and around New York restoring respect for the Nation.

The departure of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad in 1975 and the assumption of leadership by Imam Wallace D. Muhammad (now known as Imam Warith Deen Mohammed) brought drastic changes to the Nation.

After approximately 3 years of wrestling with the changes to the teachings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, Minister Farrakhan, after a re-appraisal of the condition of Black people and the program of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, decided to return to the teachings and program with a proven ability to uplift and reform Blacks.

Minister Farrakhan's tremendous success is in evidence, partly by Mosques and study groups in over 100 cities in America, Great Britain and a mission in Ghana, devoted to the teachings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Minister Farrakhan has renewed respect for the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, his teachings and program, in rebuilding the Nation. Literally millions of listeners have attended his lectures and he has been welcomed in church after church, sharing pulpits with Christian ministers from a variety of denominations showing the power of the unity of those who believe in the One God.

Min. Farrakhan and his wife Khadijah have 9 children and more than 30 grandchildren. They also have several great-grandchildren. He has addressed diverse organizations, and has been received in many Muslim countries as a leading Muslim thinker and teacher, and is welcomed throughout Africa, the Caribbean and Asia as a champion in the struggle for freedom, justice and equality.

In 1979, he started and developed The Final Call, an internationally circulated newspaper that follows in the tradition of Muhammad Speaks. In 1985, Minister Farrakhan introduced the POWER concept and in 1986
introduced a line of personal care products and a program for Black economic development.

In 1988, the resurrected Nation of Islam, under Minister Farrakhan's leadership, repurchased its former Mosque in Chicago, which served as the headquarters, and dedicated it as Mosque Maryam, the National Center for Retraining and Re-education of the Black Man and Woman of America and the World. The National Center includes a preschool and K-8 University of Islam.

In 1991. Minister Farrakhan re-introduced the Three Year Economic Program to establish an economic base for the development of Blacks through business ventures. In 1992, Minister Farrakhan outdrew a World Series
baseball game, which was played that same night, with over 60,000 people, who came to the Atlanta Dome, for the Nation's annual October Saviors' Day celebration.

In May 1993, Minister Farrakhan traveled to Libreville, Gabon, to attend the Second African-African American Summit where he addressed African heads of state and delegates from America. In October of 1994, Minister Farrakhan led 2,000 Blacks from America to Accra, Ghana for the Nation's first International Saviors' Day. Ghanaian President jerry Rawlings officially opened and closed the five-day convention.

In October 1995. Min. Farrakhan held the historic Million Man March in Washington, D.C. The popular leader and the Nation have repurchased farmland (formerly owned by the Nation of Islam) in Dawson, Georgia, and enjoyed a banner year in 1995 with the opening of the $5 million Salaam Restaurant in Chicago and the successful Million Man March on Washington.

Minister Farrakhan continued his quest for unity and progress by going on a World Friendship Tour of Africa and the Middle East in early 1996. Minister Farrakhan was well received by several heads of states in severe countries. Among them was the then South African President Nelson Mandela.

As part of the major thrust for true political empowerment for the Black community, Minister Farrakhan re-registered to vote in June 1996 and has formed a coalition of religious, civic and political organizations to represent the voice of the disenfranchised on the political landscape. In the year 2000, he convened the Million Family March in Washington, D.C. These are but some of the activities and achievements of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam throughout America and the World.

It should be known that the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan intends to fulfill the intentions of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad for the people, which includes the building of spiritual, educational and economic institutions.

 

 

 

   Lumumba "Professor X" Carson Obituary

On August 4th, 1956 Robert Lumumba Carson, like the rising of the Sun, started his journey into this world. A travel that would take him to places such as Asia, Africa and all over the globe. The eldest son of our Warrior for liberation Sonny Abubadika Carson, and Ruth Bodrick, he was destined to be the reflection of his father but with his own unique twist. Lumumba was born and raised, attended school and played on the mean streets of Brooklyn. From the Tomahawks to the BlackWatch Movement a true soldier at heart.

 In 1986 Sonny Carson started the Black Mens Movement Against Crack to address the scourge of this dangerous drug. Lumumba noticed the lack of youth involvement in the struggle and pondered how to bring young black people and their energy to the movement. Lumumba realized the influence that rap music had on young people. With good friend Paradise Gray (a promoter for The Latin Quarters), they set out to stage the first Hip-hop anti-drug concert in Prospect Park featuring Stetsasonic, Cut Master DC, Divine Sounds and Eric B and Rakim performing at their first big show. Lumumba realized that Hip-hop concerts provided the perfect venue to bring conscious messages to the masses of young black people. Lumumba (now answering to the name of Professor X the Overseer) and his newly created BlackWatch Movement joined forces with the Elder Sonny Carson and his Committee to Honor Black Heroes to protest the untimely deaths of Yusef Hawkins, Eleanor Bumpers and Gavin Cato.

Armed with his right-hand man The Grand Arkitech Paradise, a left-handed Rhythm Provider Suga-Shaft and a Grand Verbalizer Funkinlesson Brother J, they set out to awaken the minds of a young black nation. Sporting black boots and beads, bags and braids, sticks and scrolls, rings and shades, with a unique look, a funk-flow and a pro-black attitude- ready or not, they arrived from The East Blackwards with a Key, challenging each black man to check the Sissy in his self. Merging music and movement with a non-robotic black boot stomp, the messengers of BlackWatch, the X-Clan, ISIS, Queen Mother Rage, YZ and Professor X himself turned concert stages into protest rallies and mind-bending lectures.

Lumumba "Professor X" Carson began his journey to the other side of the Crossroad as an ancestor on March 17th, 2006.

He leaves to mourn his daughters Imani Mlele and Hebhyanza, his sisters Patricia, Esse, Iris and Tyishawa. His brothers Jomo, Khaba I-Lu. Mama May Carson and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins and loved ones.

The struggle continues.........

By Naquan Muhammad, Claude Paradise Gray and family

  PROFESSOR X LAST INTERVIEW

 

 

 

 

THE GREAT RICHIE PEREZ

In Love and Remembrance,

Jeff Chang
-----

This one is for the great Richie Perez, the brilliant, kick-ass New
York organizer who was an inspiration, a mentor, and an example to so
many of us.

Richie was born in 1944 and raised in the Banana Kelly neighborhood
of the South Bronx. His parents had immigrated from Puerto Rico. When
he graduated from college, he says, "My family they gave me a choice,
you know, go to the army or go to work or go to college."

As one of the few Puerto Rican students from the Bronx at Lehman
College in the early 60s, he studied economics and business education
and observed the anti-war and civil rights movements beginning to
take shape.

"I wanted to stay out of Vietnam," he told me in an interview in
2002. "I wanted to be a journalist. But they weren't giving draft
deferments for English majors. As the inner-cities got more and more
race conscious, whites who taught business subjects, most of them
came they came from the rural areas, didn't want to teach these
things in the city. So there was a shortage of stenography and typing
teachers."

"And I was researching! Because now I can't get a deferment on
English and I know I'm of the age. So what the fuck am I going to do?
Am I going to Canada? So I researched it. I mean I even headed down
to the War Resisters League and I was looking at materials, how do
you stay out of the war? It wasn't like I had deeply formulated
opinions about imperialism yet."

He became a steno and typing teacher at Monroe High School, across
the street from the Bronx River Houses, and joined the teachers'
union. Frustrated by what he came to see as the insipidness of
mainstream left politics, he became radicalized by the Black Panthers
and the anti-war movment. At Monroe, he began to recruit students
into the Black Panther Party.

In 1969, he heard that a Puerto Rican group called the Young Lords
was starting up in Harlem. "I remember I was in a party with a friend
of mine and we're trying to get a rap with these two women. You know
we were trying to impress them with our political shit," he recalled.
"And they said, 'Well if you really believe that, you shouldn't be
over here, you should be down in Harlem with the Young Lords. We
struck out, they put us down. But the thing was, they were telling
the truth man!"

"So me and him said, 'You know what? They're right.' So we went home
both of us, a changed our clothes, threw on our leather jackets and
our jeans and we went down to the People's Church--the one that had
been taken over by the Young Lords."

"There were activities, people speaking, political education, there
were Panthers there. There were poets, lots of poetry going on. Pedro
Pietri was there. A lot of people from the Nuyorican Village, a lot
of musicians. The people hooked up a bass and drum and played for
five hours. And I really liked what I saw there. Aside from the fact
that we met some really nice women too! So anyway, I said for me,
this is it."

It was a life-changing experience. Perez soon joined the Lords and
soon became Minister of Information, and edited the Party newspaper.
At 25, he was one of the oldest in the Party.

The following year, Perez opened up the Lords' Bronx office in his
old neighborhood. After a rough bout with the local gang, the Savage
Skulls, the gangs joined the Lords in bringing attention to the sorry
state of health care in the Bronx, first with the takeover of
immunization trucks and then with a takeover of the entire Lincoln
Hospital.

In 1971, the Lords decided to export their revolution back to Puerto
Rico. At this the point, Perez believed, the Party began to decline.
"(The decision) was based on an incorrect premise. And the incorrect
premise was that we are one nation and that we can export revolution
from New York City to Puerto Rico. We would unite the nation, and we
gonna show the people in Puerto Rico how you make a revolution," he
said.

"We get to PR and it's very clear that we are different. We all got
afros, we wearing dashikis, we got combat boots and fatigues, and the
fucking hottest weather and all that shit. We can't speak Spanish for
shit. And our newspaper is an English. We are looking at military
solutions. Unnecessarily. We are coming out of a capitalist,
technological, fast food, fast imagery culture, and we're comfortable
in that culture. We go to PR and everything is moving too slow. The
Movement in Puerto Rico ostracized us. "

The Lords eventually retreated from Puerto Rico and began what Perez
called a downward spiral into centralism and dogmatism. "We became
like a cult," he said. "We became so insulated their will only
listing to ourselves. We were creating our own reality and validating
our own reality."

"We began to convince ourselves that we were the greatest threat to
American imperialism. We were down to about 40 people. "

By 1977, the party had split into two armed factions and violence
became its own end. Perez and his wife were kidnapped by the opposing
faction and tortured. They broke free and went underground. Perez
would carry the physical pain for the rest of his life, walking with
a limp and a cane. He mourned the ending of the Lords, a tragic end
very similar to the Panthers, brought on by ego and COINTELPRO.

"When it ends with kidnappings and shit there's no reconciliation.
Because now we have blood debts," he recalled. "That's what happened
to the Panthers. At the first point that someone is killed and a
sequence of revenge back and forth, the possibility of reconciling
becomes more and more remote. And that's what we were involved in
too."

In time, Perez returned to teaching Puerto Rican studies at Brooklyn
College, and became central to the creation of the National Congress
For Puerto Rican Rights. Forced out of the College by right-wing
extremists, he returned to the Bronx to organize, and came into
contact with the emerging hip-hop culture just as it was exploding
into its block party era.

In hip-hop, he felt the same excitement he had with the rise of
salsa, a music movement he saw as tied to the surging political
consciousness of the late 60s and early 70s. And he heard the same
potential black-brown unity that he had in the boogaloo music of the
mid 60s.

Perez's growing interest in cultural representation proved
far-seeing. In 1980, he helped galvanize a national campaign to
boycott the film Fort Apache: The Bronx", the first shot in what
would become a national movement for representation and
multiculturalism.

"We used the Fort Apache struggle to mainstream ourselves," he said.
"And we built the broadest united front I have ever been in. There
were more church people more middle-class elements and more forces
that I normally would not have worked with. But it was good for us
because it taught us a lot of how to do that."

During the 1980s, this anti-racist movement would result in boycotts
against Hollywood films like "Charlie Chan" and "Year of The Dragon",
calls for inclusive curriculum on college campuses and public
education, and much more, eventually setting the stage for the
breakthrough crossovers of black independent film and hip-hop culture
in the late 80s.

Perez's work turned next to the issue of police brutality. A number
of high-profile killings in New York City--Michael Stewart, Eleanor
Bumpurs, Michael Griffiths and Yusuf Hawkins--brought the issue to
the media spotlight. But as always, Perez was not concerned with
being in the limelight but with organizing the community.

"We needed to go beyond 'racist pig cop', which is what we used to
chant at them. We've got to get our people to understand that it is
institutional and systemic question because we need a systemic
change. Because if you want people to move to a revolution and the
changing of structures they've got to see the structures that they
are up against," he said.

"So we began to talk about the need to take the community through a
process of fighting around the case and that in that process they
would learn all of these things and come to the conclusion that it
was the system they had to fight, not an individual racist cop."

"The families had to be empowered in that process as well, because
standing on the outside screaming at the system is important,
someone's gotta do it and, but it carries much more moral weight if
you are and the family is raising those questions.

"And it's a different kind of organizing. It is much less rhetorical,
much longer process. It was less of us vs. the State, it was more of
the families vs. the State and we are back-up. We were their troops.
But they are gonna fight the government."

By the late 90s, with the Giuliani administration implementing the
Broken Windows theory in zero-tolerance policing, police brutality
surged to the fore again with the killings of Amadou Diallo, Patrick
Dorismond, Anthony Baez, Yong Xin Huang, Gidone Busch, and many more.
Perez helped organize some of the biggest demonstrations against
police brutality in decades, protests which eventually resulted in
the scaling back of zero-tolerance policy.

During his lifetime, Perez was always deeply interested in the
Hip-Hop Generation's political development, and he personally
mentored hundreds of us.

In 2002, he sat me down for a day-long discussion in his office. We
spoke about his life and work, and what he wanted to pass on to the
Hip-Hop Generation. His words have become something of a credo to me.
In memorial to an Elder, whose spirit lives on in all of us, here are
those words:

"The arc of history is that every generation has to fight the
liberation struggle. Every generation. It doesn't matter what the
generation before you did or didn't do. You're going to have to deal
with it."

"It helps if there is a connection between the previous generation
and the new generation. It helps, it doesn't prevent you from making
mistakes. Every generation will make their own mistakes, will create
its own organizations, will create its own cultural forms, its own
expression, everything. And every generation will have its own
rhythm."

"See that's what I want to be for this generation. At this point , I
figure that's what my role is. I mean I'm a great organizer and I'm
an activist and I still like to kick ass, but how I can make my
greatest contribution is I got to be part of that transmission of
history. Because the time that you're on the historical stage is
short, man."

--
"I could go on and on the full has never been told."-Buju Banton
---
WORD::
http://cantstopwontstop.blogspot.com/

 

Charlie Chase, The First Latino DJ to officially emerge and establish Latinos as a force to the masses in Hip Hop after his predecessor DJ Disco Wiz (First Latino DJ). Born in New York City, he was raised in Williamsburg Brooklyn until the age of 12, and then moved to the Bronx where He became a musician and a true Hip Hop Pioneer in 1975. Despite alot of negative criticism from Blacks and Hispanics back then for Being a Puerto Rican DJ playing Hip Hop Music, Charlie Played in the streets, parks, clubs and schools of New York City with other pioneers such as Kool Herc, Afrika Bambbatta, Grand Wizard Theodore, Grandmaster Flash and so many others, and became a force to be reckoned with. Entertaining the masses and representing Latinos everywhere by playing everything from Hip Hop, Salsa, R&B, House, Disco and Rock was how he gained respect as a Dj and how he stayed focused on his music. Charlie then co-founded the "World Famous Cold Crush Brothers" with his partner Tony Tone. Together they recruited Grandmaster Caz, Hut Maker JDL, Almighty KG and Easy AD, thus becoming one of the primary influences immulated by many DJ's, MC's and Rappers in Hip Hop to this day. In 1981 Charlie got his first movie roll playing himself in the first Hip Hop movie ever made. The Cult hit was titled Wild Style. Getting a small speaking part and performing with his group the The Cold Crush Brothers in the movie was the break he needed to take his talent all over, rocking Japan, Germany, Italy, England, Switzerland and many other countries, playing in some of the most famous clubs and arenas like The Roxy, Studio 54, Roseland, Madison Square Garden and more. In 2003 Charlie was inducted into the Technics, DMC DJ Hall Of Fame Joining the ranks of Afrika Bambatta, Jazzy Jay, Jazzy Jeff, Grand Wizard Theodore, Grandmixer DXT, Jam Master Jay, Grandmaster Flash, Red Alert, DJ Premier, Mixmaster Ice, Grandmaster Caz & More. Today, Charlie continues to play for his fans all over the world and has become a true Hip Hop Dj Icon.

 

Afrika Islam came into this world in 1967, in the heart of the Big Apple, N.Y.C. At a young age, one could see his professional background in him and he soon became a member of Zulu Nation! His name originates from his legendary musical father, Africa Bambaataa. The Hip Hop culture, growing strong in NYC in the late 70`s, was the force that inspired Afrika Islam to start break dancing and rapping when he was only 10 year old. From dancer and rapper of the cult formation "Rock Steady Crew", soon he became the "Zulu- King".

Afrika Islam`s D.J.ing career also began in 1977 when he won the "International Annual DJ competition" and one can admire his skill as dancer in movies like "Flashdance" and "Breaking 1 2". It was during these times that Afrika Islam hooked up with Ice-T.

Both decided to co produce. Their first production, called "Rhyme Paqys" went gold, and then later to platinum. Following this success, they compiled six (6)! more platinum releases. With Ice-T`s cooperation, Afrika Islam participated in many other projects in the Hip Hop sector. Los Angeles became his new home base, where he performs his near cult status radio show "Zulu Beats" on Power 106 FM/LA.

In the 1980`s Afrika Islam successfully remixed songs from famous artists like:
the Eurythmics, Michael Jackson, De la Soul, and Wu Tang Clan.

In the mid 1990`s, Afrika Islam`s popularity grew greatly in Europe. He developed his own crossover sound: with music elements of R&B, Hip Hop, Techno & House. With his extravagant style, he was booked on the 1995 Mayday event and from this gig, proceeded non-stop bookings in clubs and events. In 1996/7, he formed up with the most popular DJ in Germany, Westbam a project named "Mr. X and Mr. Y" - that set the standards in the electronic music sector for the next three years. Afrika Islam and Westbam had created a new kind of "global sound." Afrika Islam`s DJ performance are unique. Very often, he works with 50 to 60 albums in a two hour performance.

His mastery of presenting techno sound a la Hip Hop style is behind his incredible success in many clubs all over Europe. Afrika Islam now reside three quarters of the year in Germany, with no plans of changing in the future.
 

Y@HU - when did you decide to become a disc jockey ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I HAVE BEEN A DJ FOR 3 YEARS - THEN I LEARNED HOW TO ROCK THE TURNTABLE.

Y@HU - Tell me something (as much as possible) about the deejays you know / you've met in your career ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I HAVE MET THE MASTERS ON ALL SIDES, CLUB, RADIO, STREET - A VERY LONG LIST. A FEW NAMES: GRANDMASTER FLASH, LARY LEVAN, AFRICA BAMBAATAA, FRANKIE CROCKER, DJ FLEX, BAKER BOYS, JELLYBEAN BENITEZ, DAVID MORALES, TONY HUMPHRIES, TYREE COOPER, JACKMASTER FARLEY, WESTBAM, CARL COX, JEFF MILLS, KOOL DJ HERC, T.SCOTT, BAD BOY BILL and MANY, MANY, MANY.

Y@HU - Tell me about most exciting moments in / about your deejay / producer career ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X Mr X - DON'T KNOW REALLY. I ALREADY HAVE A ACADEMY AWARD. I HAVE A GRAMMY. I'M IN THE HIPHOP HALL OF FAME. I'M IN THE DJ HALL OF FAME. I PRODUCED AND HOSTED THE FIRST HIPHOP RADIO SHOW. I'M PART OF THE WORLD ZULU BEATS ,NY. I'M THE FIRST HIPHOP DJ TO ROCK MAYDAY AND LOVE PARADE. I'M A MEMBER OF MR X & MR Y AND I WAS THE FIRST HIPHOP DJ TO ROCK WITH A ROCK BAND BODYCOUNT AND NOW MY NEW BAND MACHINE IS ALMOST READY TO RUMBLE. I HAVE NO ONE FAVORITE YET. WELL I GUESS JUST BEING THE "SON" OF AFRIKA BAMBAATAA IS MY TOP.

Y@HU - Can you tell anything interesting about music artists you know or met ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - THEY WERE ARE ALIEN :).

Y@HU - Have you ever done something else or is DJ'ing your life ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - YES - SOME HOLLYWOOD MOVIES AS AN ACTOR AND A BREAKDANCER WITH THE 'ROCK STEADY CREW' - WORD UP!

Y@HU - What do you think about today deejays whose use samplers, CD mixers, studio equipment "create" special versions of the songs / recordings, known as covers - is this serious or just fake - I mean they create nothing in fact - they just use good music made by someone else from the past. In other words - they can create nothing if it wasn't from such old, good records of the '70, '80 or '90 ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - CDS ARE ALIEN, SHIT, UFO - COVER UP! :)

Y@HU - Where do you live now?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I LIVE IN BERLIN, HOLLYWOOD AND NYC AT THE SAME TIME IN MY MIND.

Y@HU - Do you regular work now as a deejay ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - NOTHING IS REGULAR, I JUST DO IT, NOW I'M GETTING READY TO DO THE EUROVISION SONG CONTEST - THE GRAND PRIX - ME AND MY DOG WESTBAM - 2FUCKING DJS TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL - NOT NORMAL :).

Y@HU - What music do you prefer and vinyl or CD ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I LIKE WHATEVER MUSIC MAKES - THE GIRLS DANCE AND STRIP, I LIKE STRIP HOP :).

Y@HU - How do you see many today deejays - I mean - is deejay profession passion for them or kind of business - how to make money and popularity ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - BUSINESS FOR BOOKERS AND HOOKERS :). PASSION FOR THE LOVE OF FASHION :). CAN A DJDANCE ? I MAKE MORE MONEY PIMPIN HORES WITH ICE -T :). THE DJ THING IS FREE.

Y@HU - What future do you expect for techno music and today deejays ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - TECHNO IS ALIEN MUSIC, SO USE IT, DEATH TO TOY DJS, KILL THEM WITH THE RAY GUN - ZA-ZAP-WACK :).

Y@HU - Why techno is so popular in the Europe - especially Germany and no success in America ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - AMERICA HAS ITS OWN TECHNO MANIA, ITS CALLED HIPHOP ALL THIS MUSIC IS JUST TO BE REBEL - REBEL REVOLUTION - AGAINST PARENTS AND GOVERNMENT. I DANCE WITH THE REBELS :).

Y@HU - Do you prefer deejay club work or studio producer ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - CLUBS HAVE THE NICE GIRLS AND POLAND HAS THE BEST GIRLS :). THE STUDIO IS ONLY TO MAKE MUSIC TO GET TO THE BEST GIRLS THEN. FUCK EVERYTHING JUST GO OUT AND DANCE YOUR ASS OFF. ITS ALL DANCE MUSIC - BOOM, BOOM, BOOM, BOOM, BOOM and AGAIN SAME :) .

Y@HU - Do you see any chance and need to organize an international Association - something like DeeJays United similar to United Nations ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - IF THERE IS A UNITED NATIONS OF DJS - THEN ME AND MY DOGS WILL BE TERRORIST AND BLOW UP YOUR EMBASSY :).

Y@HU - What was your favourite club you worked for ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - BRAVO IN POLAND!

Y@HU - What is your opinion about - Love Parade and Mayday success - why and how it happend so big ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X X - KIDS LIKE BIGGER, BETTER, MORE, MORE, MORE, MORE, MORE, MORE. AND THE PEOPLE BEHIND IT REALLY PUT TOGETHER REAL GOOD EVENTS IN A PRO WAY. LIKE IT OR NOT THEY DO IT CORRECT. THEY ARE ALL ALIEN SLAVES TO TECHNO ELECTRO MUSIC :).

Y@HU - What or who - you could say - those were important / created techno ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - DETRIOT! JEFF MILLS AND HIS BOYS.

Y@HU - Do you plan write any book about techno era or an autobiography ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I WILL MAKE A PHOTO BOOK ABOUT ALL THE SEXY DANCING GIRLS I HAVE SEEN IN CLUBS, RAVES, BATHROOMS, BEDROOMS, BACKSTAGE, VIP AND ON THE INTERNET. LONG LIVE THE DANCING GIRLS :).

Y@HU - Do you feel yourself as connected to the deejays whose created techno music and today clubs history ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - I'M ZULU NATION -WE ARE ONE.

Y@HU - What or who - you could say - those were important / created: a) - electro ? b.) - house ? c.) - techno ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - A.) AFRICA BAMBAATAA.
B.) LARY LEVAN IN NYC and JESSE SAUNDERS IN CHICAGO. HOT MIX HOUSE 5 ARE ALSO: JACKMASTER FARLEY, TYREE COOPER, DJ SNEAK.
C.) DETRIOT SCENE USA and GERMANY: WESTBAM, SVEN VATH, MARK SPOON, LOWSPIRIT co., RAVES CLUB KIDS.
 

Y@HU - What are the best techno deejays in your opinion ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - CHRIS LIEBING, JEFF MILLS, CARL COX, DJ RUSH, WESTBAM.

Y@HU - What is your life now - deejay, producer - what projects are you working on now ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - THE MACHINE, MR X & MR Y, MOVIES.

Y@HU - What more do you want to tell to the polish and international readers ?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - POLAND HAS THE BEST DRESSED GIRLS :) - WORD UP! MR X & MR Y ARE THE BEST!!!

Y@HU - Thank you and let me ask you some questions again in some time - OK.?

AFRIKA ISLAM - Mr X - NEVER CALL MY SPACESHIP AFTER 3PM BECAUSE I'M SITTING ON THE MOON WITH A MARS BITCH :) - NIGGGGGAAAAAAAAA!
 

 

 



 

 

 "In practice it is possible to determine
directly the skin colour and hence the
ethnic affiliations of the ancient
Egyptians by microscopic analysis in the
laboratory; I doubt if the sagacity of
the researchers who have studied the
question has overlooked the possibility."
--Cheikh Anta Diop


Cheikh Anta Diop, a modern champion of African
identity, was born in Diourbel, Senegal on
December 29, 1923.  At the age of twenty-three, he
journeyed to Paris, France to continue advanced
studies in physics. Within a very short time,
however, he was drawn deeper and deeper into
studies relating to the African origins of
humanity and civilization. Becoming more and more
active in the African student movements then
demanding the independence of French colonial
possessions, he became convinced that only by
reexamining and restoring Africa's distorted,
maligned and obscured place in world history could
the physical and psychological shackles of
colonialism be lifted from our Motherland and from
African people dispersed globally.  His initial
doctoral dissertation submitted at the University
of Paris, Sorbonne in 1951, based on the premise
that Egypt of the pharaohs was an African
civilization--was rejected.  Regardless, this
dissertation was published by Presence Africaine
under the title Nations Negres et Culture in 1955
and won him international acclaim.  Two additional
attempts to have his doctorate granted were turned
back until 1960 when he entered his defense
session with an array of sociologists,
anthropologists and historians and successfully
carried his argument.  After nearly a decade of
titanic and herculean effort, Diop had finally won
his Docteur es Lettres!  In that same year, 1960,
were published two of his other works--the
Cultural Unity of Black Africa and and Precolonial
Black Africa.

During his student days, Cheikh Anta Diop was an
avid political activist.  From 1950 to 1953 he was
the Secretary-General of the Rassemblement
Democratique Africain (RDA) and helped establish
the first Pan-African Student Congress in Paris in
1951.  He also participated in the First World
Congress of Black Writers and Artists held in
Paris in 1956 and the second such Congress held in
Rome in 1959.  Upon returning to Senegal in 1960,
Dr. Diop continued his research and established a
radiocarbon laboratory in Dakar.  In 1966, the
First World Black Festival of Arts and Culture
held in Dakar, Senegal honored Dr. Diop and Dr.
W.E.B. DuBois as the scholars who exerted the
greatest influence on African thought in twentieth
century.  In 1974, a milestone occurred in the
English-speaking world when the African Origin of
Civilization: Myth or Reality was finally
published.  It was also in 1974 that Diop and
Theophile Obenga collectively and soundly
reaffirmed the African origin of pharaonic
Egyptian civilization at a UNESCO sponsored
symposium in Cairo, Egypt. In 1981, Diop's last
major work, Civilization or Barbarism: An
Authentic Anthropology was published.

Dr. Diop was the Director of Radiocarbon
Laboratory at the Fundamental Institute of Black
Africa (IFAN) at the University of Dakar.  He sat
on numerous international scientific committees
and achieved recognition as one of the leading
historians, Egyptologists, linguists and
anthropologists in the world.  He traveled widely,
lectured incessantly and was cited and quoted
voluminously.  He was regarded by many as the
modern `pharaoh' of African studies.  Cheikh Anta
Diop died quietly in sleep in Dakar, Senegal on
February 7, 1986.
---------------------------------------------------
Return to the GLOBAL AFRICAN PRESENCE Home Page
---------------------------------------------------
Copyright 1998 Runoko Rashidi. All rights reserved

  FROM:
Rastafari Speaks
rasta@trinicenter.com

To mark the occasion of African Liberation Day May 25th 2002, we present the story of Marcus Garvey as told by himself while being detained in Tombs Prison, New York 1923. He was dealing with those
who tried to misrepresent his effort and purpose, and also to speak directly to his people as to what he was about.. He built the largest Pan African Organization and significantly influenced the concept from 1918 to the present among other major accomplishments. Garvey no doubt is the greatest contributor to Pan Africanism and African Liberation struggles.

The African's Greatest Enemy
By Marcus Garvey

I WAS born in the Island of Jamaica, British West Indies, on Aug. 17,1887. My parents were black Africans. My father was a man of brilliant intellect and dashing courage. He was unafraid of
consequences. He took human chances in the course of life, as most bold men do, and he failed at the close of his career. He once had afortune; he died poor. My mother was a sober and conscientious
Christian, too soft and good for the time in which she lived. She was the direct opposite of my father. He was severe, firm, determined, bold and strong, refusing to yield even to superior forces if he believed he was right. My mother, on the other hand, was always willing to return a smile for a blow, and ever ready to bestow charity upon her enemy. Of this strange combination I was born
thirty-six years ago, and ushered into a world of sin, the flesh an[d] the devil.

I grew up with other black and white boys. I was never whipped by any, but made them all respect the strength of my arms. I got my education from many sources---through private tutors, two public
schools, two grammar or high schools and two colleges. My teachers were men and women of varied experiences and abilities; four of them were eminent preachers. They studied me and I studied them. With some I became friendly in after years, others and I drifted apart, because as a boy they wanted to whip me, and I simply refused to be whipped. I was not made to be whipped. It annoys me to be defeated; hence to me, to be once defeated is to find cause for an everlasting struggle to reach the top.

I became a printer's apprentice at an early age, while still attending school. My apprentice master was a highly educated and alert man. In the affairs of business and the world he had no peer. He taught me many things before I reached twelve, and at fourteen I had enough intelligence and experience to manage men. I was strong and manly, and I made them respect me. I developed a strong and forceful character, and have maintained it still.

To me, at home in my early days, there was no difference between white and black. One of my father's properties, the place where I lived most of the time, was adjoining that of a white man. He had three girls and two boys; the Wesleyan minister, another white man whose church my parents attended, also had property adjoining ours. He had three girls and one boy. All of us were playmates. We romped and were happy children playmates together. The little white girl whom I liked most knew no better than I did myself. We were two innocent fools who never dreamed of a race feeling and problem. As a child, I went to school with white boys and girls, like all other Africans. We were not called African then. I never heard the other term N-word used once until I was about fourteen.

At fourteen my little white playmate and I parted. Her parents thought the time had come to separate us and draw the color line. They sent her and another sister to Edinburgh, Scotland, and told her
that she was never to write or try to get in touch with me, for I was a "N-word." It was then that I found for the first time that there was some difference in humanity, and that there were different races, each having its own separate and distinct social life. I did not care about the separation after I was told about it, because I never thought all during our childhood association that the girl and the rest of the children of her race were better than I was; in fact, they used to look up to me. So I simply had no regrets. I only
thought them "fresh."^1

After my first lesson in race distinction, I never thought of playing with white girls any more, even if they might be next door neighbors. At home my sister's company was good enough for me, and at school I made friends with the colored girls next to me. White boys and I used to frolic together. We played cricket and baseball, ran races and rode bicycles together, took each other to the river and to the sea beach to learn to swim, and made boyish efforts while out in deep water to drown each other, making a sprint for shore crying out "shark, shark, shark." In all our experiences, however, only one black boy was drowned. He went under on a Friday afternoon after school hours, and his parents found him afloat half eaten by sharks on the following Sunday afternoon. Since then we boys never went back to sea.^2

"You Are Black"
At maturity the black and white boys separated, and took different courses in life. I grew up then to see the difference between the races more and more. My schoolmates as young men did not know or
remember me any more. Then I realized that I had to make a fight for a place in the world, that it was not so easy to pass on to office and position: Personally, however, I had not much difficulty in
finding and holding a place for myself, for I was aggressive. At eighteen I had an excellent position as manager of a large printing establishment having under my control several men old enough to be my
grandfathers. But I got mixed up with public life. I started to take an interest in the politics of my country, and then I saw the injustice done to my race because it was black, and I became dissatisfied on that account. I went traveling to South and Central America and parts of the West Indies to find out if it was so elsewhere, and I found the same situation. I set sail for Europe to
find out if it was different there, and again I found the same^3 stumbling-block---"You are black." I read of the conditions in America. I read "Up From Slavery," by Booker T. Washington, and then
my doom---if I may so call it---of being a race leader dawned upon me in London after I had traveled through almost half of Europe. I asked, "Where is the black man's overnment?" "Where is his King and his kingdom?" "Where is his President, his country, and his ambassador, his army, his navy, his men of big affairs?" I could not
find them, and then I declared, "I will help to make them." Becoming naturally restless for the opportunity of doing something [for] the advancement of my race, I was determined that the black man would not continue to be kicked about by all the other races and nations of the world, as I saw it in the West Indies, South and Central America and Europe, and as I read of it in America.

My young and ambitious mind led me into flights of great imagination. I saw before me then, even as I do now, a new world of black men, not peons, serfs, dogs and slaves, but a nation of sturdy men making
their impress upon civilization and causing a new light to dawn upon the human race. I could not remain in London any more. My brain was afire. There was a world of thought to conquer. I had to start ere it became too late and the work be not done. Immediately I boarded a ship at Southampton for Jamaica, where I arrived on July 15, 1914.
The Universal African Improvement Association and African Communities (Imperial) League was founded and organized five!  days after my arrival, with the program of uniting all the African peoples of the world into one great body to establish a country and Government absolutely their own.
Where did the name of the organization come from? It was while speaking to a West Indian African who was a passenger with me from Southampton, who was returning home to the West Indies from
Basutoland with his Basuto wife, that I further learned of the horrors of native life in Africa. He related to me in conversation such horrible and pitiable tales that my heart bled within me.
Retiring from the conversation^4 to my cabin, all day and the following night I pondered over the subject matter of that conversation, and at midnight, lying flat on my back, the vision and
thought came to me that I should name the organization the Universal African Improvement Association and African Communities (Imperial)
League. Such a name I thought would embrace the purpose of all black humanity. Thus to the world a name was born, a movement created, and a man became known.

I really never knew there was so much color prejudice in Jamaica, my own native home, until I started the work of the Universal African
Improvement Association. We started immediately before the war. I had just returned from a successful trip to Europe, which was an
exceptional achievement for a black man. The daily papers wrote me up with big headlines and told of my movement. But nobody wanted to be an African. "Garvey is crazy; he has lost his head," "Is that the use he is going to make of his experience and intelligence?"---such were
the criticisms passed upon me. Men and women as black as I, and even more so, had believed themselves white under the West Indian order of
societal. I was simply an impossible man to use openly the term "N-word;" yet every one beneath his breath was calling the black man a N-word.^5

I had to decide whether to please my friends and be one of the "black-whites" of Jamaica, and be reasonably prosperous, or come out openly and defend and help improve and protect the integrity of the black millions and suffer. I decided to do the latter, hence my offence against "colored-black-white" society in the colonies and America. I was openly hated and persecuted by some of these colored
men of the island who did not want to be classified as African, but as white. They hated me worse than poison. They opposed me at every step, but I had a large number of white friends, who encouraged and
helped me. Notable among them were the then Governor of the Colony, the Colonial Secretary and several other prominent men. But they were
afraid of offending the "colored gentry" that were passing for white.  Hence my fight had to be made alone. I spent hundreds of pounds (sterling) helping the organization to gain a footing. I also gave up all my time to the promulgation of its ideals! I became a marked man, but I was determined that the work should be done.

The war helped a great deal in arousing the consciousness of the colored people to the reasonableness of our program, especially after
the British at home had rejected a large number of West Indian colored men who wanted to be officers in the British army. When they were told that Africans could not be officers in the British army
they started their own propaganda, which supplemented the program of the Universal African Improvement Association. With this and other
contributing agencies a few of the stiff-necked colored people began to see the reasonableness of my program, but they were firm in refusing to be known as Africans.

Furthermore, I was a black man and therefore had absolutely no right to lead; in the opinion of the "colored" element, leadership should have been in the hands of a yellow or a very light man. On such flimsy prejudices our race has been retarded. There is more bitterness among us Africans because of the caste of color than there is between any other peoples, not excluding the people of India. I succeeded to a great extent in establishing the association in Jamaica with the assistance of a Catholic Bishop, the Governor, Sir John Pringle, the Rev. William Graham, a Scottish clergyman, and several other white friends. I got in touch with Booker Washington and told him what I wanted to do. He invited me to America and promised to speak with me in the Southern and other States to help my work. Although he died in the Fall of 1915, I made my arrangements and arrived in the United States on March 23, 1916. Here I found a new and different problem. I immediately visited some of the then so-called African leaders, only to discover, after a close study of them, that they had no program, but were mere opportunists who were living off their so-called leadership while the poor people were groping in the dark. I traveled through thirty-eight States and everywhere found the same condition. I visited Tuskegee and paid my respects to the dead hero, Booker Washington, and then returned to New York, where I organized the New York division of the Universal African Improvement Association. After instructing the people in the aims and objects of the association, I intended returning to Jamaica to perfect the Jamaica organization, but when we had enrolled about 800 or 1,000 members in the Harlem district and had elected the officers, a few African politicians began trying^6 to turn the movement into a political club.

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 HON KHALLID ABDUL MUHAMMAD DAY NATIONAL OBSERVANCE ON

JANUARY 12TH OF EVERY YEAR

In honor of Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad's life and legacy January 12th will be
recognized as a national day of observance. Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad
represented the opinions of millions, educated over 80,000 people in the
world via satellite, and fought for the divine rights of Original Humans in
Africa and America. Khallid Day, will bring people together in Celebration of
Dr. Khallid  Abdul Muhammad's Birthday and in commemoration of his
contributions to the world. Khallid Day events will consist of well-known
scholars, freedom fighters, militants, community activists, heads of
organizations, uplifting the name and value of Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad. "
On Khallid Day we reunite the Black Race, set goals, and recommit to
exercising the right to bear arms. F.C. Alili "

Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad grew up in Houston, Texas, and became an
internationally known Scholar, Historian, Activist, Educator, and Lecturer.
He earned his Doctorate Degrees in Sociology and Psychology from Dillard
University in Louisiana. Shortly after, he moved to South Africa and
participated in the anti-apartheid struggle, in addition to lecturing at
colleges in Nigeria, Senegal, Egypt, Ghana, Libya, and Uganda.  Dr. Khallid
Abdul Muhammad also lectured at Colleges in Canada, Italy, France, and
England. After living in Africa, upon his return to America, Dr. Khallid
Abdul Muhammad taught, lectured, and debated some professors at Howard
University, Yale University, Princeton University, Kean College, Columbia
University, Dillard University, Morehouse College, Spellman College,
California University in Los Angeles, California State University in Long
Beach, just to name a few. In his lifetime Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad
educated students, and scholars at over 30 Universities in America.

Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad taught African Civilization, Colonialism,
Religious Studies, Pan Africanism, Apartheid, Zionism, "The God Damned White
Man", Reparations, as well as Sociology and Psychology. He created Gye Nyame,
an African Centered Celebration, and an alternative to Thanksgiving Day.  He
also spoke at the United Nations Special Pan Africanist Congress Session on
Apartheid. Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad reached millions of People in America,
with a message of Black Power, Self Determination, Unity of Original Humans,
Economic Independence, and Liberation, at 100's of organizations, churches,
mosques, as well as educational institutes.

Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad headed the Black Muslim Movement and the New Black
Panther Party for Self Defense. He reigned supreme in his hometown, Harlem,
New York, where he held 3 major Million Youth March Rally's. In New York he
also held memberships in the United African Movement under the leadership of
Attorney Alton H. Maddox, the African Nationalist Pioneer Movement under the
leadership of Morris Thutmosis Powell, the Association for the Study of
Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC), and Marcus Garvey's U.N.I.A-African
Communities League. He also served the Nation Of Islam from 1981-1994 as the
Supreme Captain and National Spokesman, and was a featured speaker at its
World Day of Atonement in 1996, in New York. Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad
served all of the above organizations with utmost respect. He educated all
members through lecture, study groups, programs, rally's, and street speaks.
Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad also provided physical and financial support,
consultation, and strong leadership for every organization that reached out
to him.

Khallid Day, will ensure that Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad's contributions are
recorded and studied throughout Africa, America, the Caribbean Island, Fiji
Island, Canada, and Europe. Since the death of Dr. Khallid Abdul Muhammad, on
February 17, 2001, Attorney Malik Zulu Shabazz heads the New Black Panther
Party for Self Defense as National Chairman. In honor of Dr. Khallid Abdul
Muhammad, Attorney Malik Zulu Shabazz continues his work.

BLACK POWER OBITUARY

Today we gather to celebrate the courageous life, and fighting spirit of a
true soldier and warrior. Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad was a general, a
mentor, a teacher, and a strong Black man who epitomized the tenacity of our
liberation struggle. Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad represented to many of
us as a father, brother, comrade, trainer and uncompromising leader who lived
and gave his life for the liberation of African people all over the world. 
He stands in the great revolutionary line of divine with courageous African
Ancestors like Nat Turner, Sojourner Truth, Denmark Vessel, Kwame Nkrumah,
Queen Nzingha, Marcus Garvey, Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X, Huey P. Newton,
Kwame Toure' and many others who organized to free our people from a wicked
and cruel enemy.  He was proud, strong, dignified, and a man of great
character, with a beautiful heart.  He loved his people and fought day and
night to move us closer to victory over our enemies. He will be remembered as
a great field marshall, captain, minister, trainer of men, and one who would
not turn heels and run from our enemy- even when under fire.

THE EARLY YEARS

Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad, born Harold Moore, Jr. by his parents,
blessed this earth on January 12th, 1948 in Houston, Texas.  He was the
second of six children to the late Harold Moore, Sr. and Lottie B. Moore. 
His Aunt Momma Carrie Moore Vann in Houston, Texas reared him.  Minister
Khallid Muhammad, affectionately known as "butch" by the family attended
Bruce Elementary School, E.O.Smith Junior High School and all Black Phyllis
Wheatley High School in Texas.  At Phyllis Wheatley, Brother Khallid was an
esteemed member of Stagecrafters, a group of exceptional students where he
developed debate and drama skills under direction of Ms. Vernell Lillie. 
Minister Khallid as a young man would preach to cars from his porch as they
passed by on the highway and was president of Houston Methodist Youth
Fellowship. Khallid was a star quarterback, team captain of his high school
football team, an eagle scout, a class officer and a star debater.   

THE CONVERSION

Upon graduating high school, our bold and shining Black prince won a
scholarship Dillard University in Louisiana to pursue his degree in
theological studies.  At this time he ministered at Sloan Memorial Methodist
Church.  While at Dillard University young Khallid first heard Minister Louis
Farrahkan, the National Representative of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad.  He
had a big Afro and a huge medallion of Malcolm X around his neck. After
hearing Minister Farrakhan speak Khallid Abdul Muhammad joined the Nation of
Islam under the leadership of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Immediately
Brother Harold X, as he was known at that time became renown as a top
recruiter in the south for the Black Muslims.   Dr. Khallid continued his
studies and graduated from Pepperdine University in Los Angeles California.
He then was the recipient of an academic fellowship, and matriculated to do
"Intensive Studies" at Harvard, Yale, and Columbia Universities.  The skills
of higher education as well as his fighting spirit made Minister Khallid a
valuable weapon to the Nation of Islam and the Black Nation in general.

 THE EVOLUTION

When the Messenger of Allah, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad departed from
amongst us in 1975, Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad kept on fighting. At this
time he was known as Dr. Malik Rushaddin.  He traveled throughout Africa and
trained in revolutionary movements with a focus on freeing apartheid ridden
South Africa (Azania) from white oppression.  When Minister Farrakhan decided
to rebuild the Nation of slam in 1978 Minister Khallid was right there with
him when there were just a few.  Minister Khallid Muhammad served as western
regional minister of the Nation of Islam and leader of Mosque #27, which made
lightning progress under his leadership.  In 1983 Minister Louis Farrakhan
named him Khallid, which has the historical interpretation of "great warrior"
after the great follower of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) Khallid ibn Walid. Like
this great Islamic general Khallid Muhammad was called the "sword of Allah"
because of the sharp and deadly truth he spoke and the no-limit soldier
skills he possessed in the field. Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad was soon
appointed as Supreme Captain over the military in the Nation of Islam.  In
1986 Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad was appointed National Spokesman and
Representative of Minister Louis Farrakhan, following in the footsteps of
Minister Farrakhan and Malcolm X. At other points he also served the posts of
Southern Regional Minister, Minister of Mosque #7 in Harlem, New York City,
and National Assistant.

A true Pan Afrikanist, Minister Khallid Muhammad has traveled on research and
fact finding missions to Kemet (Egypt) Jerusalem, South Afrika and throughout
the African sub continent. He made his sacred pilgrimage to the Holy City,
Mecca, numerous times.  He has earned the title El Hajj Khallid Abdul
Muhammad. Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad was the creator and founder of The
New African Cultural Holiday alternative to Thanksgiving called "GYE NYAME
(G-NY-MAY). Black youth and "gang" members loved Dr. Khallid. You have heard
this dynamic soldier on rap albums from Tupac Shakur, Ice Cube, Sista
Souljah, X-Clan, Public Enemy, Scar-Face, Shaquille O'Neill, Erica Badu,
Lauren Hill, Dead Prez, Capone N' Noriega and the Black Lyrical Terrorist. 
Dynamic fiery, explosive, electrifying, spellbinding!  He has fired up and
inspired audiences at over 100 universities in the United States, Africa,
Europe and the world. He spoke at many churches and served as a minister at
the 1st Afrocentric Temple in Atlanta, Georgia before his transition to the
ancestors.

THE CONTROVERSY

After his historic lecture on November 29, 1993 at Kean College in Union, New
Jersey which shook the racist, Zionist, imperialist, white supremacist
foundation of the world, the President of the United State and Vice President
Gore condemned Dr. Khallid Muhammad.  The United States Senate voted 97-0 to
censure him.  Minister Khallid and Minister Louis Farrakhan only two in
history to be censured by the U.S. Senate.  And for the first time in
history, The United States House of Representatives (The Full Congress) in a
special session, passed House Resolution 343 condemning a so called private
citizen. At historic Howard University in 1994 Khallid Muhammad keynoted the
world wide-watched Black Holocaust conference with Dr. Leonard Jeffries, Dr.
Tony Martin and convened by then student organizer Malik Zulu Shabazz.
 
These events shook the world but Khallid Muhammad did not break under the
pressure.  In May, 1994 an assassination attempt was made on his life. 
Khallid Muhammad was blessed to recover and fight with even more vigor and
intensity. Fortunately the New Black Panther Part was not afraid of Dr.
Khallid Muhammad, they defended him and later elected him as National
Chairman.

THE FINAL VICTORIES

1998 Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad led an armed militant group of New Black
Panther members into Jasper Texas to chase out the Klu Klux Klan who were
making a mockery of the beheading and dragging death of brother James Byrd.  
On Sept 5th, 1998 He was the convener of the Million Youth March Black Power
Rally, held on Malcolm X Blvd in New York. With the help of the December 12th
Movement, the Million Youth March won historic legal battles against the
racist Guiliani administration over free speech "constitutional rights". The
Million Youth March went forward the streets of Harlem were flooded with
throngs of Black youth and people who supported this massive Black Power
revival.

As the leader of the New Black Panther Party for Self-Defense the party
spread nationwide. He leaves intact his National Spokesman, now National
Chairman- Attorney Malik Zulu Shabazz; National Chief of Staff-Hashim Nzinga;
National Minister of Defense- Brother David Foreman; National Minister of
Information-Minister Quannell X; National Youth Minister Michael Muhammad,
National Minister of Commerce Morris Thutmosis Powell The New Black Panther
Party is alive and well with chapters thriving throughout the country and
world. 2001 was an awesome year for the NBPP.  Dr. Khallid's vision of a
Black Power Movement is alive and very well!!!

THE TRANSITION AND LEGACY

Minister Khallid Abdul Muhammad leaves to cherish his memories; his wife,
Queen Nefertari Muhammad, three sisters; Gloria Glenn from Los Angeles,
Cynthia Moore Kelly from Los Angeles, KaShelia Moore Jackson from Houston,
Texas; two brothers, Frank Moore Claybourne from Los Angeles, Darington Moore
Smith from Los Angeles; father-in-law, Mr. Thomas Ambush of Cedric Maryland;
his children, David and mother Mattie Morris Van, Khalfani and mother Mahasin
Rushiddin, and Farrakhan Khallid, Malik, Kiki, Amir, Ali and mother Khallidah
Muhammad; four grandchildren and a host of nieces, nephews, friends, and
comrades.

LONG LIVE OUR BLACK POWER GENERAL!!!!